Japanese team discovers ‘super disc’ material

A Japanese research team has found a material that could be used to make a low-price super disc with data storage capacity thousands of times greater than a DVD, the lead scientist said Monday.

The material transforms from a black-colour metal state that conducts electricity into a brown semiconductor when hit by light, according to Shin-ichi Ohkoshi, chemistry professor at the University of Tokyo.

The material, a new crystal form of titanium oxide, can switch back and forth between the metal and semiconductor states at room temperature when exposed to light, creating an effective on-off function for data storage.

It is “promising as a material for a next-generation optical storage device,” Ohkoshi told AFP by telephone.

A material that changes colour with light can be used in storage devices as colours reflect light differently to contain different information.

His team has succeeded in creating the material in particles measuring five-to-20 nanometres a five-billionth to 20-billionth of a metre in diameter.

If the smallest particle is used, the new disc could hold more than 1,000 times as much information as a Blu-ray disc, provided that matching data-writing and reading equipment are developed.

via Japanese team discovers ‘super disc’ material.

Skull and Bones (HC)

Author John Drake has a new novel which is now available, Skull and Bones. It is in Hardcover in the UK and on Kindle in the US.

The third in the rip-roaring adventure series of ‘Treasure Island’ prequels for fans of ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ and Flashman

When infamous ‘gentleman of fortune’ Captain Flint is captured by the Royal Navy and condemned to hang for mutiny and piracy, it seems that the secret location of his buried treasure will die with him. But Flint has an audacious plan to gain command of ship and crew before they reach London and escape the hangman’s noose.

Read More Skull and Bones (HC).

Seahorse (PB)

Author Michael Aye’s latest novel Seahorse is now available for purchase or order in paperback worldwide.

A needful nation calls. Admiral Lord Anthony has just returned from Gabe’s wedding and is finally able to relax with Lady Deborah and their new daughter. Then the admiralty’s messenger arrives. Lord Anthony has been given command of His Majesties ships in the West Indies.

He and Gabe set sail with a new squadron only to face old enemies, personal tragedies, daring privateers and the French who have signed a alliance with the determined American colonies.

Read more Seahorse (PB).

True Colours by Alaric Bond (PB)

Author Alaric Bond’s latest novel True Colours is now available for purchase or order in paperback worldwide.

1797. The Royal Navy is immobilised by mutiny and the only thing that’s standing in the way of an invasion is a commander who is communicating with a fleet that isn’t there.

While Great Britain’s major home fleets are immobilised by a vicious mutiny, Adam Duncan, commander of the North Sea Squadron, has to maintain a constant watch over the Dutch coast, where a powerful invasion force is ready to take advantage of Britannia’s weakest moment.

Read More Astrodene’s Historic Naval Fiction.

Astrodene Review: Floating Gold by Margaret Muir

When you have read as many naval fiction novels as I have the first challenge a new author and book has to meet is do the story and characters seem fresh. This is a challenge Floating Gold achieves from cover to cover in a pacy narrative which held my attention.

The book follows the exploits of Captain Oliver Quintrell and his crew aboard HM frigate Elusive as they sail out into the Atlantic with sealed orders after the signing of the Peace of Amiens. As well as the officers the book follows some of the crew and one of the refreshing things was that the crew was represented by some of the junior warrant officers, the carpenter and cooper, who usually only get a walk on part.

Read More Astrodene Review: Floating Gold by Margaret Muir.

Nasa shuttle Atlantis and space station seen passing in front of Sun | Mail Online

Against the awesome backdrop of the sun, they are at first little more than specks. Look a little closer, however, and you can make out the outline of solar panels, and next to it a dart-shaped silhouette.

Against the awesome backdrop of the sun, they are at first little more than specks.  Look a little closer, however, and you can make out the outline of solar panels, and next to it a dart-shaped silhouette.  This extraordinary image shows the Space Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station in front of the sun.  It was taken by astro-photographer Thierry Legault who, had he blinked at the crucial moment, would have missed it. The back of the shuttle Atlantis and International Space Station can be seen passing in front of the Sun  The back of the shuttle Atlantis and International Space Station can be seen passing in front of the Sun  The back of the shuttle Atlantis and International Space Station can be seen passing in front of the Sun  The back of the shuttle Atlantis and International Space Station can be seen passing in front of the Sun  For despite detailed planning and even travelling from France to Spain to take the image, the actual event was visible for just 0.54 of a second because of the speed of the two spacecraft.  The 48-year-old Frenchman travelled to Madrid so he would be in the ideal location to watch the transit of the two spacecraft.  This placed him in the centre of a five-mile wide visibility band that stretched across Spain, southern France and Northern Italy.  Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1279952/Nasa-shuttle-Atlantis-space-station-seen-passing-Sun.html#ixzz0oYU4XXmRThis extraordinary image shows the Space Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station in front of the sun. It was taken by astro-photographer Thierry Legault who, had he blinked at the crucial moment, would have missed it.

For despite detailed planning and even travelling from France to Spain to take the image, the actual event was visible for just 0.54 of a second because of the speed of the two spacecraft.

The 48-year-old Frenchman travelled to Madrid so he would be in the ideal location to watch the transit of the two spacecraft. This placed him in the centre of a five-mile wide visibility band that stretched across Spain, southern France and Northern Italy.

Read More Nasa shuttle Atlantis and space station seen passing in front of Sun | Mail Online.